Cheap New York City Airport Transportation - JFK

By: Josh - Josh@CheapInTheCity.com

Last Updated: October 21, 2013

Getting to and from NYC’s airports can be stressful and expensive. In this article we are going to break down the different options you have to get to and from New York City’s JFK International Airport. By utilizing this guide, you can find the best option for yourself. Each option varies on how convenient it may be. Price and convenience must be taken into consideration when choosing your mode of transport.

 

Below we will break things down by transportation option.

 

NYC SUBWAY to JFK– DIRT CHEAP & NOT CONVIENIENT

 

The cheapest mode of transportation is the subway. You can expect to ride for at least 45 minutes this way. The cost is $2.50 each way per passenger. You can take the free JFK parking shuttle to the long term parking lot. This will be where the JFK subway station is located. From there take the subway into the city.

 

Another option is taking the Airtrain from the airport to the subway station. It is more convenient for sure, but will cost you $5 each way per person over 5 years of age and then you must still pay the $2.25 to get on the actual subway.

 

The Long Island Railroad (LIRR) to JFK – CHEAP & NOT REALLY CONVIENIENT

 

The long Island Railroad is another cheap option. You’ll buy a ticket and board the train at Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan. The ride is faster than the subway and doesn’t cost much more. You’ll take the LIRR from Penn Station to Jamaica Station in Queens. After you arrive you’ll want to take the AirTran from Jamaica to the actual airport.

 

 

The LIRR from Penn Station in Manhattan to Jamaica costs as little as $6.25 off-peak and the AirTrain will cost $5, for a total of $11.25. You may have to pay a bit more during rush-hour.

 

NYC BUS & VAN SERVICES & SHUTTLES to JFK – KIND OF CHEAP & KIND OF CONVIENIENT

 

There are a number of different bus and van lines that travel between JFK and Manhattan. Some of the more popular include Super-Shuttle, Airlink and New York Airport Service (NYAS).

 

Super-Shuttle costs a flat $30 for the first guest and an additional $10 for each additional passenger in your group over 3 years of age. I’ve used this service several times. It is a good option for those that want to be picked up from their exact address. It is also nice if you have a good deal of luggage. This is a cheaper option for a direct and convenient ride to JFK from your home or hotel. The drawback is that you are sharing the van with others, so you may have to ride around the city picking up other passengers before you actually head to the airport.

 

Airlink is a lot like Super-Shuttle in that there is an option to share a van. The rates vary, but start at just $19.60 each way. It may be worth it to call them up and see if you can get a deal on a shared van for less than Super-Shuttle. Airlink also offers large group luxury vans for those traveling together.

 

NYAS is a bus service. But it is cheap! If you don’t mind starting from a pre determined bus stop in the city (mainly in midtown and near popular hotels) you can take a NYAS bus for as little as $10 each way. Not a bad deal.

 

NYC TAXI CABS to JFK – NOT CHEAP BUT CONVIENIENT

A very popular option is a taxi cab. NYC has a flat rate of $52 plus tolls plus $0.50 tax for a one way trip with a taxi cab to ANYWHERE in Manhattan from JFK. If you’re going to another borough of the city, you’ll have to pay meter rates plus tolls. Taxis are very convenient if you have a lot of luggage and want to get to a specific address and fast.

 

NYC LIMO & CAR SERVICE to JFK – MOST EXPENSIVE & VERY CONVIENIENT

 

Another, but more expensive option is to get a limo or Town car with driver. There are many which wait around the airport. Be sure to ask for pricing ahead of time before you get in. Some companies such as Airlink offer such car services. Typically you pay $57 to $100 each way plus tolls and tip. It may not be cheap, but it is the best way to go if you want to travel in style.

 

 

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